Grilled Apricot & Arugula Salad

by Rachel on August 16, 2011

Grilled Apricots

During our Farm to Table cooking class with Chef Clement Gelas in Park City, Utah – we constructed this terrific grilled apricot salad.  We used a fresh red currant salad dressing that we made with locally grown fresh currants.  I’ve looked around for red currants and they are not easy to find outside of farmer’s markets.  This salad would be delicious with a store bought, or homemade balsamic vinaigrette.  If you make your own dressing err on the side of a lightly sweet dressing to set off the grilled fruit.

Grilled Apricot & Arugula Salad (6-8 servings)

  • 8-10 ripe apricots cut in half
  • 8 cups fresh baby arugula
  • ½ cup grated Gruyere cheese (drop for vegan version)
  • ½ cup toasted pine nuts (make sure they say MEDITERRANEAN pine nuts on the bag, and not China, Russia or anywhere in Eastern Europe – see my post on Pine Mouth for the explanation)
  • ½ cup dried cranberries
  • ½ cup Red Currant Salad Dressing (or a balsamic vinaigrette)

Heat your BBQ to its highest setting.  Spray vegetable spray (such as Pam) on your grill.  Place the apricots, cut side down, on the grill.  Grill them until they are cooked through and have dark, almost black grill marks.  Set them aside.

In a medium-sized mixing bowl toss together the arugula, pine nuts, dried cranberries and salad dressing (the Red Current Salad Dressing Recipe was in a prior post focused on the cooking class I took in Park City, Utah with Chef Clement Gelas).  Plate the tossed greens.  Place the grilled apricots on top of the greens and then sprinkle the cheese on top of that.  VOILA.

{ 1 comment… read it below or add one }

Julia August 31, 2011 at 8:40 pm

Rachel,
I love your recipes – very modern and yet simple an homey. Recently I have been inspired to plan a dinner party in my garden for 8 close friends. I would love something rather opulant and evocative of the late 17th century Regency period. I can find Syllabub recipes easily enough, but I have got to serve more than just dessert and there is a sad lack of information as far as actual savoury recipes is concerned. Any ideas where I might get my hands on modern interpretations if not the genuine thing?

thanks,
julia

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